Testimonials

"My home is on the Historic Register and I participated in the tax abatement program 19 years ago. However, when my home came to the end of the 15 year tax abatement, it was revalued and I pay substantially more property tax than if I would have not gone the Historic Register. The tax savings over the 15 year period have virtually been wiped out in last 4 years and I pay double the property tax compared to my neighbors. If I would have NOT participated in the program, I would have been protected by the 3% max yearly increase." Rob Lloyd - Buckman Home Owner

"Ask Irvington residents how this all worked out for them... After much acrimony by any who understood all the ramifications...we are now to understand that it is simply that the fees associated with historic design review are too high. That is certainly true. But the greater loss is in the new restrictions against improvements not in keeping with the aesthetics of the Irvingtonians in charge. Want to put up solar panels? Good luck. Want to put up a satellite dish? Better be NO part viewable from the street. Want a new door...new windows...better start saving up because there will be few options." "HoloceneMan" comment on Oregonian article

"We just went through Irvington Historical Design review this summer. It's important to note that it's not just a problem of fees, the statutory requirements also impose significant project delay (minimum 6 weeks, up to 8) or longer if there is an appeal; which the neighborhood association gets to file at no cost whereas it is additional cost if the homeowner requests. To me, this creates an unnecessary element of uncertainty in the mind of a homeowner wishing to make an improvement. As your article suggests the whole process currently serves as a disincentive in terms of encouraging small improvements which is all that a lot of residents can afford. The fees are in addition to the standard BDS permit costs so it's a double whammy in terms of encouraging non-permited work." Tony Jones comment on Portland Architecture blog post